English

Introduction

Cecil Jones Academy English Department takes pride in delivering a diverse curriculum, engaging the students and allowing them to become creative, independent learners. Our goal is to enable students to be reflective readers, skilled writers, confident speakers and creative thinkers. We work as a team to plan courses that are stimulating and enjoyable with activities that enable students to investigate texts and explore the ways in which meanings are communicated. We have a clear focus on the development of students' literacy skills and use assessments to provide precise targets that will allow students to make progress and have a sense of direction for future learning.

Our subject area seeks to develop the following in all our students:

  1. A positive attitude towards reading by:
    • Exploring a range of texts from throughout the centuries;
    • Exploring texts from various genres;
    • Developing an understanding of how authors communicate meaning.
  1. Confident and highly skilled writers by:
    • Providing opportunities to explore various forms of writing;
    • Developing an understanding of the methods used to become skilled writers;
    • Developing vocabulary and creative ideas to use in writing.
  1. Confident and persuasive Speakers by:
    • Analysing and discussing historic and powerful speakers;
    • Providing opportunities for students to contribute orally to discussions;
    • Developing confidence when speaking in front of an audience.

 

Our goal is to enable students to be reflective readers, skilled writers, confident speakers and creative thinkers. We work as a team to plan courses that are stimulating and enjoyable with activities that enable students to investigate texts and explore the ways in which meanings are communicated. We have a clear focus on the development of students' literacy skills and use assessments to provide precise targets that will allow students to make progress and have a sense of direction for future learning.

 

Areas of study covered in KS3:

Year 7: Year 8: Year 9:
Analysing Roald Dahl Gothic Literature Narrative and Descriptive Writing
Gothic Literature A Christmas Carol Journeys-Non-Fiction
Adventure Writing Of Mice and Men DNA or Inspector Calls
Poetry- Benjamin Zephaniah Poetry From Other Cultures Reading Non-Fiction
Macbeth Survival Reading and Writing Functional Writing
Holidays Reading and Writing The Tempest Power and Conflict Poetry

 

Homework expectations (hours and completion standards):

Homework to be completed at least once a week. The expectation is that students would spend 30-45 minutes on this task.

KS4

English Language challenges you to read and understand a wide range of fiction and non‐fiction texts, testing skills such as: defining vocabulary; skimming and scanning text; locating and summarising information; explaining language effects on the reader and transforming ideas from stimulus texts in to their own writing in a range of genres.

English Literature will build on the skills developed at KS3 to enable you to respond to literature texts of poetic, script and prose form. You will write a comparative essay as coursework based on two or more studied texts, and you will study poetry and one set text in preparation for the exam. (Text choices will vary from class to class and essay questions will allow learners to draw on their own reading experiences alongside studied texts.) You will also learn about essay writing and academic vocabulary and expression.

 

Areas of study covered in KS4:

Year 10 and 11: Literature Year 10 and 11: Language
Macbeth Language Paper one Reading: Analytical Writing (Fiction)
A Christmas Carol(Novel) Language Paper One Writing: Descriptive Writing
DNA /Inspector Calls Language Paper Two Reading: Analytical and Comparative Writing (Non-Fiction)
Power and Conflict Poetry Language Paper One Writing: Functional Writing
Unseen Poetry

 

Specification details (web address)

AQA Language 8700

The AQA specification is designed to inspire and motivate students, providing appropriate stretch and challenge whilst ensuring that the assessment and texts are, as far as possible, accessible to all students. It enables students to develop the skills they need to read, understand and analyse a wide range of different texts and write clearly.

AQA have developed two equally-balanced papers, each assessing reading and writing in an integrated way.

 

AQA English Literature 8702

AQA have worked closely with teachers to design the English Literature specification to inspire, challenge and motivate every student, regardless of ability level. A range of texts is included to cater for the needs of teachers and students in all educational contexts. There are texts that will be familiar, as well as new ones that will inspire young readers. It’s fully co-teachable with GCSE English Language, so students will benefit from the transferable skills.

Course component breakdown:

English Language Paper One:

What is assessed:

Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing

How is it assessed:

Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes

80 Marks

50% of GCSE

 

English Language Paper Two:

What is assessed:

Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing

How is it assessed:

Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes

80 Marks

50% of GCSE

English Literature Paper One: 1: Shakespeare and the 19th-century no

What’s assessed
  • Shakespeare plays
  • The 19th-century novel
How it’s assessed

Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes
64 marks
40% of GCSE

Questions
Section A Shakespeare: students will answer one question on their play of choice. They will be required to write in detail about an extract from the play and then to write about the play as a whole.
Section B The 19th-century novel: students will answer one question on their novel of choice. They will be required to write in detail about an extract from the novel and then to write about the novel as a whole.

English Literature Paper Two:

What’s assessed
  • Modern prose or drama texts
  • The poetry anthology
  • Unseen poetry
How it’s assessed
  • written exam: 2 hour 15 minutes
  • 96 marks
  • 60% of GCSE

Questions
Section A Modern text: students will answer one essay question from a choice of two on their studied modern prose or drama text.
Section B Poetry: students will answer one comparative question on one named poem printed on the paper and one other poem from their chosen anthology cluster.
Section C Unseen poetry: Students will answer one question on one unseen poem and one question comparing this poem with a second unseen poem.

Homework expectations

Students should spend one hour a week on homework at least. Independent study and revision should be completed at least 3 times a week.

Trips and Visits

Theatre Trips/Performances

Students are given the opportunity to watch a performance of some of the prescribed texts at GCSE. These opportunities may be performed by a professional theatre company in school or at The Globe Theatre.

How can I support my child at home?

Parental support is 8 times more important in determining a child’s academic success than social class. The good news is that you don’t need to be an expert in any of the subjects your child chooses to make a real difference.

Having an understanding of topical world news issues is essential for the new language GCSE. Watching the news and reading broadsheet newspapers will develop cultural capital and help students to have material for writing questions.

Activities to complete:

  1. Study an advertisement in a magazine or newspaper or on the internet. Decide who the audience is, and how you know, what is the advert trying to say and how it says it. Think carefully about the words and images that have been used. Think about the size of the picture and the words – what effect is the advert trying to have on you? Jot down some words to describe the effect you think the advertiser is trying to create and then use a thesaurus and develop and extend your vocabulary.
  2. Read a newspaper report from The Guardian, The Times, The Independent or The Telegraph. Write a short summary of the article in your own words.
  3. Go on to the BBC Bitesize web site, English section and complete the Reading Non-Fiction Texts section: Getting started, genre, audience, purpose, language, information, style, tone.
  4. Compare two articles; they should be discussing a similar topic with different viewpoints. E.G An article on Homework and the benefits, with another writer’s different attitude.
  5. Go onto the BBC Bitesize Web site, Reading Non-Fiction Texts section and complete the comparative exercise and the comparative exam question.
  6. Here is the opening to an essay: ‘Write a persuasive article for a teenage fashion magazine about whether following fashion is important’. Remember who your audience is and what your purpose is.
  7. Plan a response to this question: Write an article for a newsletter in which you aim to persuade your readers that animals should be released from any form of captivity.
  8. Read a Sunday paper. Choose a substantial article and using the table, analyse the effectiveness of the article. Allow yourself twenty five minutes and write an essay which explains how the writer communicates with the reader.
  9. Allow 50 minutes to plan and answer this question: Describe your ideal holiday location. Use a wide range of adjectives and descriptive writing techniques.
  10. Watch news reports, documentaries, read newspapers about issues like: healthy eating/teenage crime/smoking/drinking/drugs/environment issues/bullying.
  11. Practise writing 5 minute plans for writing questions.

Recommended GCSE websites:

Recommended GCSE texts or revision guides:

  • CGP Revision guides are available for the Language GCSE and all Literature texts- we would recommend any CGP revision guides.
  • Collins AQA GCSE Language and Literature: All-in-One Revision and practice.

Handwriting clubs

Handwriting clubs is held on Tuesdays after school. Students can work on and improve their handwriting to ensure their presentation is to the highest standard.

Homework Club

Homework club is run after school on Thursdays after school. Students can seek help from an English teacher to complete their homework.