Course Description 

The Geography department is excited to be offering our subject at A-level.  We will be following AQA’s 7037 specification that builds on from GCSE and also allows our students the opportunity to study new as well as existing topics in greater depth.  Below is the outline of what will be offered and how it will be assessed.

Component 1: Physical Geography

What’s assessed

Section A: Water and carbon cycles

Section B: Glacial systems and landscapes

Section C: Hazards

How it’s assessed

  • Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 120 marks
  • 40% of A-level

Questions

  • Section A: answer all questions (36 marks)
  • Section B: answer either question 2 or question 3 or question 4 (36 marks)
  • Section C: answer either question 5 or question 6 (48 marks)
  • Question types: multiple-choice, short answer, levels of response and extended prose

 

Component 2: Human Geography

What’s assessed

Section A: Global systems and global governance

Section B: Changing places

Section C: Resource security

How it’s assessed

  • Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 120 marks
  • 40% of A-level

Questions

  • Section A: answer all questions (36 marks)
  • Section B: answer all questions (36 marks)
  • Section C: answer either question 3 or question 4 or question 5 (48 marks)
  • Question types: multiple-choice, short answer, levels of response, extended prose

 

Component 3: Geography Fieldwork Investigation

What’s assessed

Students complete an individual investigation which must include data collected in the field. The individual investigation must be based on a question or issue defined and developed by the student relating to any part of the specification content.

How it’s assessed

  • 3,000–4,000 words
  • 60 marks
  • 20% of A-level
  • marked by teachers
  • moderated by AQA

In many ways, the ‘jump’ from GCSE is not as jarring as previous years.  Many of the topics have their basis in GCSE however the complexity of the connections between concepts has increased. Some topics such as the two core modules, Water and Carbon Cycles and Changing Places are unique to the A level.

One major difference between the two courses is the fieldwork component.  At GCSE, our field trips were assessed as part of a third paper however at A-level, it will be treated as a coursework element. As a department, we are looking forward to our trip to the Lake District to explore the interconnectivity of human land use and the post-glacial environment.  This will provide an opportunity to students to experience some high level teaching in a stunning setting.

Geography is seen as a very attractive qualification for those wishing to progress to university as it is commonly considered as a humanity and science.  Geography students are recognised for the analytical skills developed at A Level and commonly will undertake courses in the Earth sciences, Business, Economics, Civil Engineering, Logistics and of course Geography.

Geography is an attractive A Level due to the skills that are developed during the course. Geography students excel in the business and finance sector as the understanding that students gain of interdependence and concepts such as capital flows is one of the key elements that underpins the industry.  A career in civil engineering is popular due to the good grounding that our students receive involving physical processes and understanding how that impacts the UK’s landscapes.  Component 3 is a good chance for anyone seeking a role in research and development or a general science career as the skills learnt in their investigation will be applicable in a vast array of the tasks involved in the field.

All Alevel Geographers are required to go on a 4 day residential where field work is practiced and data is collected .On our return to School students write a project based on their hypotheses.

We currently visit the Hunstanton coastline in Norfolk for our field studies.